I_HAVE_A_STORY_FOR_YOU
Andrew Sawyer's blog of fun things that inspire me.
Graduate of Rhode Island School of Design for Graphic Design. Now resident of San Francisco, CA.
My Website!
I_HAVE_A_STORY_FOR_YOU
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visualgraphic:

Science vs Delirium
visualgraphic:

Science vs Delirium
visualgraphic:

Science vs Delirium
visualgraphic:

Science vs Delirium
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VALERIYAVOLKOVA
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VALERIYAVOLKOVA
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thekhooll:

Visual Language
by Cristiana Couceiro
thekhooll:

Visual Language
by Cristiana Couceiro
thekhooll:

Visual Language
by Cristiana Couceiro
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mtweiner:

thinknorth:

Photographer Grady Mitchell contacted me not long ago about using one of my old mountain designs as a tattoo for himself. I loved the idea, and am now glad to see that it worked out better than I could have imagined. 
Turns out, Grady is a pretty damn good photographer, and I encourage you all to go visit his blog and site: http://gradymitchell.tumblr.com/
no doubt in my mind you’ll enjoy his work. Tell him I said hey while you’re there. 

Definitely wantn’ on a mountain tat. This is gorgeous. 
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bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
bobbycaputo:

Back to the Future With 1970s Space Colonies



Back in the 1970s, NASA’s Ames Research Center conducted three space colony studies, when man was fresh off the moon landing and colonization of space seemed imminent. As part of the project, artists were asked to render the studies’ findings in dazzling color and detail. Together, these images evoke a unique sense of time and place with stunning precision, leaving the viewer with a bizarre feeling that is simultaneously retro and futuristic.
The Bernal design featured here was a spherical living area that could hold about 10,000 people.
Perhaps the most famous of these circular rotating stations were those of Space Station V, depicted in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey—which now seem brilliant: The centrifugal force created by the rotation would have an effect indistinguishable from gravity, as we can see in the scenes in which Dr. Frank Poole (Gary Lockwood) is merrily jogging around the revolving wheel of a station.



(Continue Reading)
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http://grainedit.com/2010/05/17/rise-fall-a-concertina-of-life-by-micah-lidberg/
goldengods:

micah lidberg
http://grainedit.com/2010/05/17/rise-fall-a-concertina-of-life-by-micah-lidberg/
goldengods:

micah lidberg
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whale ships
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lustik:

Broderade stängsel - Tina Frausin
lustik:

Broderade stängsel - Tina Frausin
lustik:

Broderade stängsel - Tina Frausin
lustik:

Broderade stängsel - Tina Frausin
lustik:

Broderade stängsel - Tina Frausin
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theartofanimation:

Michelle Morin
theartofanimation:

Michelle Morin
theartofanimation:

Michelle Morin
theartofanimation:

Michelle Morin
theartofanimation:

Michelle Morin
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Sanna Annukka / Marimekko / Pohjolassa
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gouache paintings 
by Andy Rementer
bigactive
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staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.
staceythinx:

Illustrator Florian Nicolle breaks down break dancing.